NSW government announces changes to bail and illegal gun laws in wake of Sydney siege

NSW government announces changes to bail and illegal gun laws in wake of Sydney siege

NSW Premier Mike Baird has unveiled changes to the state’s bail and gun laws, following last year’s Sydney siege.

17 recommendations were made to the government in February, following the Martin Place Siege Review.

The Premier has announced “anyone with links to terrorism or violent extremism, including returned foreign-fighters, will be refused bail.”

Under the changes, bail will be refused (unless there are exceptional circumstances) where the accused is charged with an offence that carries a custodial sentence and:

  • is a person in relation to whom a terrorism control order has been made;
  • is on bail for, and/or has previously been convicted of, a Commonwealth terrorism offence, including being a foreign fighter; and/or
  • is on bail for, is currently charged with, and/or has previously been convicted of, being a member of a terrorist organisation under s310J of the Crimes Act 1900 (NSW).

Mr Baird has conceded the actions of terrorists cannot always be stopped, but he has vowed to what he can to prevent tragedies like the Sydney siege.

“In the uncharted world of lone-wolf terrorism we will always face a degree of risk,” Mr Baird said in a statement on social media.

“But we can reduce this risk by introducing tough new laws that ensure there are fewer dangerous people on our streets who would find it harder to access illegal firearms,” he said.

The gunman responsible for the siege in December at the Lindt cafe, Man Haron Monis was bailed on several occasions for 43 charges of sexual assault, and being an accessory to the murder of his ex-wife.

In terms of gun laws a new offence will be created for the possession of a stolen firearm, which will carry a maximum penalty of 14 years imprisonment.

Additionally, consistent maximum penalties of at least 14 years’ imprisonment will be introduced for offences relating to unauthorised possession, use, supply, or acquisition of firearms where the firearm involved is a pistol, a prohibited firearm, or is defaced, unregistered or stolen.

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Amy Whittaker
Amy Whittaker 1402 posts

Amy joined the NRN team in August 2011, before graduating from a B of Arts (Communication-Journalism)/B of Sports Studies from Charles Sturt University in December 2011.

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