New Technology to Detect Diseases by the Human Breath

New Technology to Detect Diseases by the Human Breath

By Jay-Anna Mobbs

 

A new type of technology is being developed, which has the potential to identify 17 diseases purely by the breath of a human.

And the developer, Noushin Nasiri, a material engineer at the University of Technology in Sydney, said the technology isn’t too far away.

The nanotechnology is inspired by the science of a dogs nose, which has the ability to detect human illness.

The product is aimed to be small enough to be inserted into a mobile phone, which would make it the worlds smallest breathalyser.

The sensor is layered with a chemical material, which is designed to pick up nanoparticles in breath, used to calculate the concentration of the biomarker.

This type of technology would allow a higher chance for early detection of diseases such as diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, lung cancer, breast cancer, asthma, Schizophrenia, and kidney and liver disease.

“We’re trying to detect the disease immediately; you breathe and we give you the results,” Dr Nasiri said.

The product is said to be three years away from hitting the market at its most basic model.

Dr Nasiri explained the breath analysis could potentially save money due to its accessibility.

“It’s very cheap because you can have it in your phone so you don’t need to spend money on hospitalisation and tests,” she said.

The ultimate goal of Dr Nasiri is to develop a sensor that has the ability to identify ten diseases in one breathe, and for the results to be delivered via a mobile phone app.

“To make it the size of a portable device that can be installed in front of drugstores or clinics, we’re not very far [away],” she said.

 

 

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