New Sanctions hit North Korea

New Sanctions hit North Korea

By Vittorio Travan

In a unanimous decision handed down by the United Nations Security Council, North Korea will face a new set of sanctions.

The response comes after the September 3rd confirmation by North Korea that the testing of a hydrogen bomb was successfully carried out.

This is the ninth time sanctions will be enforced over the nuclear weapons and ballistic missile program in Pyongyang. The sanctions will aim to cap textile exports and fuel supplies in a strategy aimed at reducing North Korea’s ability to fund and fuel their weapons program.

Textile exports are among Pyongyang’s top exports, while oil imports to North Korea will be capped at 2 million barrels per year. Crude oil exports out of Pyongyang will also be capped that will see the sanctions starve the country of AUD$623 Million in additional revenue.

This will place a massive strain on the oil consumption of the country, as the country imports 4.5 Million of refined petroleum products and 4 Million barrels crude oil per year. The move will decrease oil imports by 30% and reduce oil importation into North Korea by 55%.

In response to the new sanctions, North Korea’s ambassador was critical and told the UN affiliated Conference of Disarmament in Geneva the country rejects all sanctions.

“My delegation condemns in the strongest terms and categorically rejects the latest illegal and unlawful UN Security Council resolution,” he said.

Despite the critical response from Pyongyang, the sanctions were in fact watered down following discussions with North Korean allies Russia and China.

With fears the sanctions could contribute to a negative humanitarian effect, Russia and China also both raised the issue of the UN not being able to do anything else if the nuclear program continues.

Following the voting that saw China and Russia withhold their VETO votes, US ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley said she hopes the sanctions push North Korea in the right direction.

“We are done trying to prod the regime to do the right thing, we are now trying to stop it from having the ability to do the wrong thing,” Ms Haley said.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe was also thankful of the new sanctions, saying they will force change for the good.

“It is important to put an unprecedented level of pressure on North Korea to make it change its policies,” the Japanese PM said to press in Tokyo.

While other measures will prevent the exportation of North Korean workers in an effort to stop them earning overseas wages. This will see the tightening of technology sharing between Pyongyang and other countries while also restricting economic co-operations.

The sanctions also place limits on the exports of natural gas liquids while the new language also restricts joint ventures between North Korean entities. Measures have also been introduced to allow inspection of North Korean vessels in international waters in an aim to curb the importation of prohibited cargo.

 

Here is Nikki Haley the US ambassador to the UN speaking to the Security Council about the full list of sanctions that North Korea will face.

 

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