Labor concerned over possible breach of classified ASIO documents

Labor concerned over possible breach of classified ASIO documents

Prime Minister Tony Abbott is coming under pressure from the Opposition, about how classified documents showing terrorist hot spots were allowed to be shown on national television.

Mr Abbott visited ASIO headquarters yesterday to be briefed by officials on the main areas considered terrorism hotspots in Sydney and Melbourne.

Maps were laid out on the table while camera crew filmed the meeting, which was later shown on television.

ASIO has admitted the maps were not supposed to be made public.

Labor has raised concerns the publication may threaten Australia’s national security, with Opposition Defence spokesperson David Feeney suggesting Mr Abbott may have facilitated a significant security breach.

“The Prime Minister must immediately clarify whether these documents were for official use only,” he said.

But ASIO Chief Duncan Lewis says  he is “satisfied that no information of national security significance was visible while media representatives were present”.

Image: ABC TV

About author

Libby Dreyer
Libby Dreyer 1729 posts

Libby has worked as a Senior Journalist at National Radio News since February 2011. She graduated with a Bachelor of Journalism from the University of Canberra in December 2010.

View all posts by this author →

You might also like

National

Victorian child dies after drinking raw cow’s milk

One child has died and four others are seriously ill, after drinking raw cow’s milk.

National

What’s for dinner? Figures show more Australians go hungry

By James Wells   While most Australians take their daily meals for granted, new figures show there are more people going hungry.   A joint statement from the Public Health

National 0 Comments

750kg of cocain seized en route to Australia

Australian and international authorities have intercepted 750kg of cocaine on a Yacht in Vanuatu.

National 0 Comments

Deadline looming for media reforms to pass

The Federal government has until the end of the day to meet its own deadline for pushing through media reforms.