End of Cricket Pay War

End of Cricket Pay War

By Loren Howarth

 

After ten months of deliberation, Cricket Australia and the Australian Cricketers Association have finally agreed to terms, ending the pay war.

The saga which was the worst industrial crisis in Australian cricket in forty years, left over two hundred players out of contract since the beginning of July, 2017.

The new five year model is very different to the one which previously existed between the governing body and players, with more flexibility available in the way the sports revenue is distributed.

All male and female players, domestic and international alike, will receive 30 per cent of the $1.67 billion forecasted revenue, with 2.5 per cent to be set aside for performance bonuses.

Grassroots cricket was also at the heart of the battle, and will receive a forecast amount of $25 million via a CA and ACA investment fund. CA Chief Executive James Sutherland, said the fund is likely to be topped up through cost saving reviews of CA and the state associations.  

“We will be looking for somewhere between $10m and $20m extra every year to invest into grassroots cricket.” He said.

In the next twenty four hours, the proposed deal will go to a player vote, and the ACA will recommend that its members accept.

Cricketing writer Gideon Hague told the ABC that the battle had gone on for too long and said the deal could have been struck after a week.

Even so, the agreement comes as a sigh of relief for avid cricket fans, who were worried that the pay dispute could have derailed the upcoming Ashes series.

The Steve Smith led Australian tour of Bangladesh will also go ahead later this month, with a pre-tour camp taking place in Darwin next week.

With the new modernised deal coming at an increased economic cost, it has also not been cheap in terms of relationships, with Mr Sutherland admitting that the dispute caused severe tensions, not only between players and the governing bodies, but also with fans.

“Both parties acknowledge and regret that. We are restoring certainty and beginning to repair relationships, especially with the fans. We want the focus to be back on the cricket.”

But the CA Chief Executive is confident that relationships will be mended by the beginning of the summer competition.

 

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earche04
earche04 66 posts

Erin joined the NRN team straight after graduating from a Bachelor of Communications (Journalism) at Charles Sturt University in 2016.

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